190 North Pointe Blvd #1,
Lancaster, PA 17601
717-560-6444

Scleroderma

Our team of professionals and staff believe that informed patients are better equipped to make decisions regarding their health and well-being. For your personal use, we have created an extensive patient library covering an array of educational topics, which can be found on the side of each page. Browse through these diagnoses and treatments to learn more about topics of interest to you.

As always, you can contact our office to answer any questions or concerns.

Patient Instructions:

Pre-Operative Instructions:

Pre-Op Instructions.pdf

Patient Post-Operative Instructions:

Post-Op Wound Care Instructions.pdf

Post-Op Instructions for Wound Seal Powder.pdf

After a Shave Biopsy Instructions.pdf

After a Punch Biopsy Instructions.pdf

Patient Instructions following Blu Light for Actinic Keratoses.pdf

Cosmetic Procedures:

Patient Instructions following Blue Peel.pdf

Post-Injection Filler Instructions.pdf

Microneedling After Care Instructions.pdf

Post-Op Sclerotherapy Instructions.pdf

Post Procedure Care Instructions for Intense Pulse Light.pdf

V-Beam Post-Op Instructions.pdf

 

Roughly 300,000 people in the United States suffer from scleroderma. This chronic connective tissue disease results from an over-production of collagen in the skin and other organs. Scleroderma usually appears in people between the ages of 25 and 55. Women get scleroderma more often than men. The disease worsens slowly over years.

There are two types of scleroderma: localized scleroderma, which involves only the skin, and systemic scleroderma, which involves the skin and other organs, such as the heart, lungs, kidneys, intestine and gallbladder. Typical symptoms of the skin include skin hardening, skin that is abnormally dark or light, skin thickening, shiny hands and forearms, small white lumps beneath the skin's surface, tight facial skin, ulcerations on the fingers or toes and change in color of the fingers and toes from exposure to heat or cold. Other symptoms impact bones, muscles, lungs and the digestive tract.

There is no known cause of scleroderma, nor is there a cure. There are individualized treatments that are designed to help alleviate certain symptoms and decrease the activity of the immune system to further slow down the disease.


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